Quantcast Figure 22-1: Conventional Food Service Flow Diagram

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 


MIL-HDBK-1191
CONVENTIONAL FOOD SERVICE
FLOW DIAGRAM
RECEIVING
STORAGE
Freezer, Refrigerator, Room Temperature
PREPROCESSING
Vegetable Processing
Meat Processing
Ingredient Procesing
SANITATION
PREPARATION & ASSEMBLY
CENTER
Cooking Center
Warewashing
Baking Center
Pot Washing
Nourishment Center
Final Assembly & Preportioning Center
SERVICE
Cafeteria Serving Line
Tray Assembly
CUSTOMER
Patients
Staff, Military Personnel, Guests
Figure 22-1: Conventional Food Service Flow Diagram
Conventional Food Systems are equipped with full service bakery, salad and
sandwich preparation areas.  Current studies show that temperature
controlled cold rooms (50 F) are ideal for preparing cold salads, sandwiches
and breaking down meat into meal quantities.  Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Point (HACCP) studies show that food borne illness is decreased due
to the increase of food safety created by the refrigerated food preparation
environment.  Butcher shops complete with meat saw and grinder, are not
needed in most facilities.  The salad/sandwich preparation area should be
designed so that finished food products can be moved easily into a walk-in
refrigerator that safely stores the items at or below 40  F.  Coordinate
table top equipment items with specific facility requirements.
22.6
CONVENIENCE FOOD SYSTEM.  With a convenience system almost all
foods utilized are fully prepared foods purchased from outside sources and
properly stored.  Some in-house cooking and/or preparation will supplement
purchased prepared foods (salads, vegetables, etc.).  The prepared foods are
subsequently brought to their appropriate serving temperatures on the
premises as near to meal times as possible and maintained at these
temperatures until served.  Today many food services are using different
forms of convenience foods that require extensive rethermalization equipment
units that also double as a holding unit, thereby increasing the flexibility
of the equipment item.  Refrigeration and freezer space is also an important
consideration.  Space for these units should be calculated at 0.014 cubic
meter per meal served per day.  This figure also depends on prime vendor
delivery and should be significantly increased if deliveries are not
scheduled at least three times per week.  Material handling equipment and
22-3



 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +